Category Archives: Global

They say: “It will soon be illegal to punish customers who criticize businesses online” Like No ratings yet.

Consumer Review Fairness Act bans customer gag clauses, awaits Obama signature.

Congress has passed a law protecting the right of US consumers to post negative online reviews without fear of retaliation from companies.

The bipartisan Consumer Review Fairness Act was passed by unanimous consent in the US Senate yesterday, a Senate Commerce Committee announcement said. The bill, introduced in 2014, was already approved by the House of Representatives and now awaits President Obama’s signature.

The Commerce Committee held a hearing on gag clauses a year ago and said it heard “testimony from Ms. Jen Palmer, a plaintiff in Palmer v. KlearGear, where a company demanded the removal of a negative online review or payment of $3,500 in fines because the online merchant’s terms of service included a non-disparagement clause. When the review was not taken down, the company reported the unpaid $3,500 to a credit reporting agency as an outstanding debt, which negatively impacted the Palmers’ credit.”

Palmer beat Kleargear in court, but only after a years-long ordeal. In other cases, a supplements maker, called Ubervita, threatened legal action against customers leaving negative reviews on Amazon, and a jewelry store sued a customer who left a one-star review on Yelp.

The Consumer Review Fairness Act—full text available here—voids any provision in a form contract that prohibits or restricts customers from posting reviews about the goods, services, or conduct of the company providing the product or service. It also voids provisions that impose penalties or fees on customers for posting online reviews as well as those that require customers to give up the intellectual property rights related to such reviews. The legislation empowers the Federal Trade Commission to enforce the new law and impose penalties when necessary.

The bill also protects reviews that aren’t available via the Internet.

(Information continues at: http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/11/congress-passes-law-protecting-right-to-post-negative-online-reviews/)

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Fake Britain – what we need to know around the world 1 No ratings yet.

This episode investigates the fake sports memorabilia that cost collectors thousands, how fake debt collectors were finally brought to justice, how the latest must-have kitchen gadget is being faked and how fakers are cashing in on the latest running trend.
(From: Fake Britain Series 7 – Episode 7 )

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They say there are “66 Ways to Protect Your Privacy Right Now.” Like No ratings yet.

Ah, the joys of the connected life: opportunities to engage with global communities, be educated and entertained, and shop with ease. But these go hand in glove with intrusions from marketers and threats from criminals. The tips here, compiled with input from dozens of security experts, will help you take control. We also have pulled out a shorter list of just seven, super-fast steps you can take right now, in less than 10 minutes. And Julia Angwin, the author of “Dragnet Nation,” shares her quest for privacy and security in the digital age.

You can begin with either list or the essay—and you don’t have to follow every tip, or even most of them. The important thing? Just get started.

In a hurry? Check out the Consumer Reports 10-Minute Digital Privacy Tuneup.

Or you can skip straight to specific advice on: screen locks, snail mail privacy, unbreakable passwords, mobile account safety, connected devices, handling public WiFi, everyday encryption, Facebook settings, home WiFi settings, boosting web browser privacy, beating ransomware, how to avoid phishing schemes, and Google settings.

1. Check Your Data Breach Status
Wondering whether your personal data is for sale on the web? At haveibeenpwned.com you can check your email addresses and usernames against lists from 120 known breaches at com-panies including Adobe, LinkedIn, and Snapchat. (You’ll need to register to check the full database.) If your name pops up, change the password for the compromised account and any other site where—tut, tut—you were using the same password. (Bonus tip: Pros pronounce “pwned” as “poned,” not “pawned.”)

2. Stop WiFi Imposters
Laptops, smartphones, and other WiFi-enabled devices can automatically connect to familiar networks. That’s convenient—no one wants to enter a password for their home or work WiFi every day—but it can also be risky. A hacker can set up a rogue WiFi network with the same name as a legitimate one such as “Google Starbucks” or attwifi and trick your gadgets into joining it.

Periodically get a fresh start by using your devices’ network or WiFi settings to prune the networks you join automatically. Most devices let you delete networks one by one, but if you have an iPhone or iPad, you need to go to Reset Network settings under General settings and delete all of them at once.

(More info at: http://www.consumerreports.org/privacy/66-ways-to-protect-your-privacy-right-now/)

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Welcome to our ConsumerPals.com Site. 1 5/5 (1)

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